Most Popular European Cookies

Most Popular European Cookies

Europeans love good food and drinks, as a result, the food culture is very important here. People like to enjoy the meal with friends and families, so long dinners are an inseparable part of weekends and holidays in many European countries. But how could dinner be good enough without a dessert? Therefore, the list of traditional European deserts is very long. One of the top desserts here is cookies but they can be very different in every country and region. So, let’s see what the most favorite cookies in Europe are!

Danish Småkager

The yellow, creamy, and soft cookies with sugar sprinkles on top and packed in a metal box decorated with vintage paintings are one of the best things that Denmark can offer you! There are many different shapes and ingredients of these cookies. Usually, they are made of butter, wheat flour, sugar, and most incorporate ingredients such as chocolate, marzipan, dry fruits, different flavorings, and nuts. You can buy a round tin of the butter cookies anytime a year, but traditionally it was gifted as a Christmas present in Denmark.

Austrian Vanillekipferl

Vanillekipferl is traditional, sweet, half-moon-shaped cookies made of flour, sugar, butter, and vanilla. The cookies often contain ground nuts such as hazelnuts, almonds, or walnuts. Sometimes they are decorated with the sugar glaze, chocolate, or sprinkles of marzipans. These sweets belong to Austria, but they are very common in Germany and Hungary because originally, they were invented in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. These cookies are a traditional Christmas treat in Austria, so there is no better way to enjoy them than attending the Christmas market and indulge yourself with vanillekipferl and a cup of hot wine.

Dutch Stroopwafel

The sugar bomb is the only term to describe these Dutch sweet sins! These cookies consist of a very thin layer of syrup that consists of sugar, butter, and cinnamon that is sandwiched between two thin wafers. According to some historical sources, these treats were invented in the late 18th century in the city of Gouda. Usually, these cookies are consumed with strong tea, black coffee, or brandy. Even if stroopwafel is a very traditional Dutch sweet, you can buy them all around Europe.

Italian Amaretti

These cookies are a type of biscotti and they are known in Italy since the Middle Ages. Their name came from the Italian word “amaro” which means “bitter” as these treats have a strong flavor of bitter almonds or apricot kernels, which are traditionally used in the recipe, together with egg whites and sugar. They can be made either dry and crispy, or soft and chewy. That depends on the region. Italians are used to enjoy these sweets with a cup of strong espresso and a shot of the sweet, almond-flavored liqueur called amaretto Disaronno.

Italian Amaretti
Italian Amaretti

French Madeleines

Madeleines are the perfect accompaniment to afternoon tea – these buttery cookies with the consistency of a sponge cake are slightly browned and crispy on the outside while remaining soft and tender on the inside. A typical dessert of the Lorraine region, madeleines is said to have originated in Commercy. The traditional form of these cookies is a little shallow and typically they are flavored with almonds or lemon and are served with a dusting of powdered sugar.